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Divorce Archives

"Nesting" may help children transition through divorce

When a couple decides to part ways, they must make a number of difficult choices. Divorcing parents face particular challenges as many of their decisions during the divorce process revolve around their children's needs, both emotional and physical. Experts advise divorcing parents to be mindful of the potential negative effects of their separation on the children and keeping the process as amicable as possible can help. Toward this end, divorcing Massachusetts parents may wish to consider one possible family living arrangement called "bird nesting," also known as "nesting."

Tips for a less painful divorce for Massachusetts couples

Whether a Massachusetts couple decides to separate by mutual agreement, or one partner initiates the split, many decisions need to be made. Although each person likely feels overwhelmed during the time immediately following a breakup, it is important to think clearly and rationally at this time, as the decisions that are made during the separation and divorce process will shape the years to come for all parties involved. Fortunately, an expert offers some practical tips for moving forward effectively.

Parents who divorce can ease the transition for children

When Massachusetts couples go through a divorce, they typically have to learn how to deal with many new and often daunting situations and usually within a climate of high stress. When divorcing couples are also parents, a new level of stress is placed on them while they try to do their best to help the children cope with their new reality. Fortunately, a clinical psychologist offers tips for parents trying to navigate their way through this particularly challenging part of the divorce process.

Guidelines for successful co-parenting after divorce

Divorcing couples in Massachusetts typically face various hurdles during the process; decisions need to be made regarding division of assets, living arrangements and many other areas. However, for divorcing parents, the most important decisions to be made are likely those involving the children. After enduring the divorce process, most parents now need to learn how to co-parent their children, with the goal of providing a healthy, happy environment for all involved parties. To help ensure this outcome, parents can keep in mind a few key guidelines.

Financial decisions made during divorce require care

When a Massachusetts couple decide to split, the emotional toll on each party can be overwhelming. However, the effects of poor financial decisions made during the divorce process can be equally as daunting. To prevent a future lifestyle that no one envisioned, a divorcing couple would be wise to carefully consider their options in several financial areas, particularly if their finances are closely intertwined.

Military divorce is hard, but not impossible

Military life is already difficult enough as it is, and throwing a divorce into the mix can seriously complicate things. Those going through a military divorce usually have needs and worries that differ from other families in Massachusetts. If you or your spouse is in the military and you are ready to divorce, make sure you understand the challenges that may lay ahead. 

Does divorce lower college attendance rates?

Massachusetts parents usually do not jump into the decision to end their marriages without first giving it some serious consideration. Parents frequently consider how divorce will not only affect themselves, but also their children. This type of careful thought is important to use during divorce, as staying on top of serious matters can help minimize any potential negative impacts. 

Upper middle class couples may fight more in property division

Being financially secure is a priority for most people in Massachusetts, but divorce can throw a wrench in even the best-laid plans. Worry over money and future financial stability can cause some individuals to panic and fight over seemingly unimportant issues during property division. According to one family law expert, one group is more likely to fight than others. 

Child support and agreement modification protect children

From purchasing school supplies to paying for extracurricular activities to simply putting food on the table, there's no getting around it -- raising kids in Massachusetts is expensive. It can be difficult enough to transition from two incomes to one, but throwing children in the mix complicates matters even more. Child support exists to make sure that you have the financial means to continue providing for your children, and any changes to you or your ex's income may require a modification.

Stay informed -- don't let financial surprises upset your divorce

Financial surprises are rarely good news. Rather than waking up and learning that they have won the lottery, most people are met with unexpected money issues that will have a negative impact on their daily lives. Unfortunately, divorce can bring about many of these unwelcome surprises if Massachusetts divorcees -- particularly women -- are not prepared.

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