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Types of alimony awarded in Massachusetts divorce cases

Different individuals will have to address different divorce matters if they choose to end their relationships with their spouses. For example, Massachusetts residents with children will have to confront the challenging topics of support and custody of their kids. Those who own extensive property or who have premarital agreements may have different property settlement processes than those without. Many parties to divorce, though not all, will negotiate terms regarding spousal support, which is also called alimony.

When alimony is agreed to or awarded by a court, it provides one party to a divorce with financial support from the other party. Alimony becomes an important divorce topic when one party may have no earning capacity or is unable to get a job to support themselves once their marriage is over. When the parties to a divorce are both financially self-sufficient, alimony may not be necessary.

In Massachusetts, alimony can look very different depending upon the needs of the parties. It can be a short-term and only compensate a party until they have transitioned into their post-divorce life. It may be indefinite if a party cannot work or is unable to attain the training or education needed to enter the work force.

Individuals who have given up their own career progression to help pay for their ex-spouse’s education and advancement may qualify for reimbursement alimony, but readers should be aware that alimony is case-driven. Individuals should not rely on the outcomes of others to guess what may happen in their own divorce negotiations and hearings.

Divorce is complicated and can be further convoluted by alimony. Help from knowledgeable divorce and family law attorneys can be beneficial to those readers who have questions. This post does not offer any legal and advice and provides general information only on important topics related to family law.

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