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Making the difficult decision to file for divorce

For many couples in Massachusetts, the decision to end the marriage can be torturous. It may be difficult to discern if the troubles they are going through are simply a rough patch or signals that the marriage has run its course. They may spend months or years in an unhappy marriage because they are afraid that filing for divorce would be a mistake. While there is no magic formula to help someone decide to stay put or move on to a new life, there are some factors to consider that may tip the scale one way or another.

Why are you staying? This is a question that may generate some thoughtful answers. Some spouses remain in an unhappy marriage because they have a lot invested, such as children or a joint business venture. Others may feel it is too late to start over and find happiness outside the marriage. Still more may wonder if it is even financially feasible to divorce.

Someone who is considering divorce may seek the advice of a counselor who can guide him or her through a search for the reasons why the marriage is no longer fulfilling. A spouse may feel worn out by the marriage, especially if he or she has dealt with a partner who has been unfaithful, abusive or prone to substance abuse. On the other hand, the feeling of indifference and detachment from one’s spouse may point to an irreparable rift that may grow more pronounced with time.

A spouse who labors over whether to divorce may find many areas of life pay the toll for that indecision. Preoccupation with such a momentous decision can lead to emotions and moods that affect one’s job, health and relationships with family and friends. The best way to make a difficult decision is to gain as much information as possible about the options and potential ramifications of each side. A compassionate and experienced family law attorney in Massachusetts can provide that kind of advocacy and support.

Source: verywellmind.com, “Making the Decision to End Your Marriage“, Sheri Stritof, Accessed on May 8, 2018

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